Pure Grit for the Game

Armenia hosted a spectacular opening of the European Individual Chess Championship (EICC). This is the 15th EICC, an event which attracts over 100 grandmasters as it is a stepping stone to the World Championship. The top 23 finishers in the EICC will qualify for the 2015 Chess World Cup, with the top two in that event gaining entry to an 8-man Candidate’s Tournament in 2016 that will determine the challenger in a World Championship match at the end of that year.

Charudatta Jadhav may be thousand miles away from the Armenian grand event but he too is a champion in the game. A visually impaired chess champion, Jadhav has lent a helping hand to many others like him to master the game and checkmate the many challenges in life. Charudatta Jadhav lost his vision at the age of 13. The only reason that gave him courage to fight his disability at that tender age was his passion for the game. He soon became the blind superhero of Indian chess.

But becoming a champion and winning numerous medals was not the end. The realization that there is no visually impaired Indian player present to compete at the international level troubled him. And as a result he invented special software for the blind called Talk 64. Today, 18 countries have been benefitting from the invention. Not only in India, the world of chess has been witnessing a sea change.

Former world chess champion turned human rights activist Garry Kasparov has been granted Croatian citizenship after finding it increasingly difficult to live in Russia as a pro-democracy campaigner.

From Armenia to India to Croatia, the chess world saw a new trend and a new beginning. A new citizenship, a new challenge to help others and a new location for a chess championship.

 

Armenia hosted a spectacular opening of the European Individual Chess Championship (EICC). This is the 15th EICC, an event which attracts over 100 grandmasters as it is a stepping stone to the World Championship. The top 23 finishers in the EICC will qualify for the 2015 Chess World Cup, with the top two in that event gaining entry to an 8-man Candidate’s Tournament in 2016 that will determine the challenger in a World Championship match at the end of that year.

Charudatta Jadhav may be thousand miles away from the Armenian grand event but he too is a champion in the game. A visually impaired chess champion, Jadhav has lent a helping hand to many others like him to master the game and checkmate the many challenges in life. Charudatta Jadhav lost his vision at the age of 13. The only reason that gave him courage to fight his disability at that tender age was his passion for the game. He soon became the blind superhero of Indian chess.

But becoming a champion and winning numerous medals was not the end. The realization that there is no visually impaired Indian player present to compete at the international level troubled him. And as a result he invented special software for the blind called Talk 64. Today, 18 countries have been benefitting from the invention. Not only in India, the world of chess has been witnessing a sea change.

Former world chess champion turned human rights activist Garry Kasparov has been granted Croatian citizenship after finding it increasingly difficult to live in Russia as a pro-democracy campaigner.

From Armenia to India to Croatia, the chess world saw a new trend and a new beginning. A new citizenship, a new challenge to help others and a new location for a chess championship…